DIY Natural Dyes for Colored Eggs

How to make Natural Dyes for Eggs

Per cup of water use:

  • 1 cup chopped purple cabbage — makes blue on white eggs, green on brown eggs
  • 1 cup red onion skins — makes lavender or red eggs
  • 1 cup yellow onion skins — makes orange on white eggs, rusty red on brown eggs
  • 1 cup shredded beets — makes pink on white eggs, maroon on brown eggs
  • 2 tablespoons ground turmeric — makes yellow eggs
  • 1 bag Red Zinger tea — makes lavender eggs

→ Add 1 tablespoon white vinegar to every cup of strained dye liquid

→ For every dozen eggs, plan on using at least 4 cups of dye liquid


How to Make Naturally-Dyed Easter Eggs

 

Makes 1 dozen eggs

1 dozen hard-cooked eggs, room temperature, or white and brown eggs, preferably not super-fresh
4 cups dye liquid made from any of the following:

  • 1 cup chopped purple cabbage per cup of water — makes blue on white eggs, green on brown eggs
  • 1 cup red onion skins per cup of water — makes lavender or red eggs
  • 1 cup yellow onion skins per cup of water— makes orange on white eggs, rusty red on brown eggs
  • 1 cup shredded beets per cup of water— makes pink on white eggs, maroon on brown eggs
  • 2 tablespoons ground turmeric per cup of water — makes yellow eggs
  • 1 bag Red Zinger tea per cup of water— makes lavender eggs

1 tablespoon white vinegar per cup of strained dye liquid
Neutral oil, such as vegetable or grapeseed

Pour the amount of water you need for the dye you're making into a saucepan — you can make 4 separate batches of different colors or 1 large batch of a single color; follow the ratios given above for each ingredient to make more or less dye.

Add the dye matter (purple cabbage, onion skins, etc.) and bring the water to a boil. Turn the heat down to low and simmer, covered, for 15 to 30 minutes. The dye is ready when it reaches a hue a few shades darker than you want for your egg. Drip a little dye onto a white dish to check the color. When the dye is as dark as you like, remove the pan from the heat and let the dye cool to room temperature. (I put the pot on my fire escape and it cooled off in about 20 minutes.)

Pour the cooled dye through a fine-mesh strainer into another saucepan (or into a bowl then back into the original pan if that's all you have). Stir the vinegar into the dye — use 1 tablespoon of vinegar per cup of strained liquid.

Arrange the room-temperature eggs in single layer in a baking dish or other container and carefully pour the cooled dye over them. Make sure the eggs are completely submerged.

Transfer the eggs in the dye to the refrigerator and chill until the desired color is reached. Carefully dry the eggs, and then massage in a little oil to each one. Polish with a paper towel. Store the eggs in the refrigerator until it is time to eat (or hide) them.

Recipe Notes:

You can also start with raw eggs and cook them in the dye bath as described in this post on Onion-Skin Eggs. I found that with dyes like the Zinger tea and beets, the color was more concentrated with the refrigerator method. Of course, this method requires clearing out some space in the refrigerator.

This Recipe is from The Kitchn. For more recipes check out their webpage.

Classic Hard-Boiled Eggs

Stokesberry Farms 

Stokesberry Farms 

Place eggs in saucepan large enough to hold them in single layer. Add cold water to cover eggs by 1 inch. Heat over high heat just to boiling. Remove from burner and cover pan.

Let eggs stand in hot water about 12 minutes for large eggs (9 minutes for medium eggs; 15 minutes for extra large).

Drain immediately and serve warm. Or, cool completely under cold running water or in bowl of ice water, then refrigerate. 

Tips & Facts:

For easier peeling, use eggs that are 7 to 10 days old. Pack hard-boiled eggs for lunch. Slice or cut into wedges for tossed salad. Dice for egg salad. Color and decorate for Easter.

Banish the greenish ring. This harmless but unsightly discoloration that sometimes forms around hard-boiled yolks results from a reaction between sulfur in the egg white and iron in the yolk. It occurs when eggs have been cooked for too long or at too high a temperature. Our method – cooking eggs in hot, not boiling, water, then cooling immediately – minimizes this.

Food safety precaution: Piercing shells before cooking is not recommended. If not sterile, the piercer or needle can introduce bacteria into the egg. Also, piercing creates hairline cracks in the shell, through which bacteria can enter after cooking.

Never microwave eggs in shells. Steam builds up too quickly inside and eggs are likely to explode.

Very fresh eggs can be difficult to peel. To ensure easily peeled eggs, buy and refrigerate them a week to 10 days in advance of cooking. This brief “breather” allows the eggs time to take in air, which helps separate the membranes from the shell.

Hard-boiled eggs are easiest to peel right after cooling. Cooling causes the egg to contract slightly in the shell.

To peel a hard-boiled egg: Gently tap egg on countertop until shell is finely crackled all over. Roll egg between hands to loosen shell. Starting peeling at large end, holding egg under cold running water to help ease the shell off.

Storage time: In the shell, hard-boiled eggs can be refrigerated safely up to one week. Refrigerate in their original carton to prevent odor absorption. Once peeled, eggs should be eaten that day.

High altitude cooking: It’s almost impossible to hard-cook eggs above 10,000 feet.

For more information about eggs or how to prepared check out: www.incredibleegg.org