Classic Hard-Boiled Eggs

Stokesberry Farms 

Stokesberry Farms 

Place eggs in saucepan large enough to hold them in single layer. Add cold water to cover eggs by 1 inch. Heat over high heat just to boiling. Remove from burner and cover pan.

Let eggs stand in hot water about 12 minutes for large eggs (9 minutes for medium eggs; 15 minutes for extra large).

Drain immediately and serve warm. Or, cool completely under cold running water or in bowl of ice water, then refrigerate. 

Tips & Facts:

For easier peeling, use eggs that are 7 to 10 days old. Pack hard-boiled eggs for lunch. Slice or cut into wedges for tossed salad. Dice for egg salad. Color and decorate for Easter.

Banish the greenish ring. This harmless but unsightly discoloration that sometimes forms around hard-boiled yolks results from a reaction between sulfur in the egg white and iron in the yolk. It occurs when eggs have been cooked for too long or at too high a temperature. Our method – cooking eggs in hot, not boiling, water, then cooling immediately – minimizes this.

Food safety precaution: Piercing shells before cooking is not recommended. If not sterile, the piercer or needle can introduce bacteria into the egg. Also, piercing creates hairline cracks in the shell, through which bacteria can enter after cooking.

Never microwave eggs in shells. Steam builds up too quickly inside and eggs are likely to explode.

Very fresh eggs can be difficult to peel. To ensure easily peeled eggs, buy and refrigerate them a week to 10 days in advance of cooking. This brief “breather” allows the eggs time to take in air, which helps separate the membranes from the shell.

Hard-boiled eggs are easiest to peel right after cooling. Cooling causes the egg to contract slightly in the shell.

To peel a hard-boiled egg: Gently tap egg on countertop until shell is finely crackled all over. Roll egg between hands to loosen shell. Starting peeling at large end, holding egg under cold running water to help ease the shell off.

Storage time: In the shell, hard-boiled eggs can be refrigerated safely up to one week. Refrigerate in their original carton to prevent odor absorption. Once peeled, eggs should be eaten that day.

High altitude cooking: It’s almost impossible to hard-cook eggs above 10,000 feet.

For more information about eggs or how to prepared check out: www.incredibleegg.org

 

A vinaigrette: Jenn Louis Pinot Noir Cran Sauce

  • 10 whole allspice berries
  • 10 whole cloves
  • 10 whole black peppercorns
  • 4 cups fresh or thawed frozen cranberries
  • 1 ½ cups Oregon pinot noir
  • 1 cup light brown sugar, loosely packed
  • 1 cup clover or wildflower honey
  • 1 cup fresh orange juice
  • 6 strips orange zest, about 1 inch by 3 inches, removed with a vegetable peeler
  • 2 (4-inch) sprigs rosemary
  • 1 small cinnamon stick
  • 1 vanilla pod

Combine allspice, cloves and peppercorns in a spice grinder or coffee grinder and pulse until finely ground.

In a medium saucepan, combine cranberries, wine, brown sugar, honey, orange juice, orange zest, rosemary, cinnamon stick and ground spices.

With the tip of a paring knife, split vanilla pod lengthwise. Use the back of the knife to scrape seeds from pod. Add seeds and pod to pot.

Bring mixture to a boil, then reduce heat to a gentle simmer. Cook, stirring often, until cranberries have burst and liquid thickens slightly, about 15 minutes. Remove from heat and discard zest, rosemary sprigs, cinnamon stick and vanilla pod.

Transfer mixture to a bowl and let cool.

Basic Pot of Stovetop Beans

Ingredients

  • 1 pound (about 2 cups) dried beans
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and left whole
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Rinse the beans and remove any dirt, pebbles or debris. Place in a large bowl and cover with cold water until they are submerged by an inch or so. Soak for at least 4 hours, then drain. The soaked beans will have doubled in volume, to about 4 cups.

Place the beans in a large pot, add 8 cups of cold water, plus the garlic. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat and cook at a hard boil for 5 minutes. Skim off any foam that rises to the top. 

Cover, lower the heat and cook at a gentle simmer for 25 minutes. Season with the salt. Cover, and cook for an additional 25 minutes. Check for doneness. Cook in 10-minute increments until the beans are tender to the bite. Cooking times may vary depending on the age of the beans. 


From here, you can take the beans to the next level -- chili, stew or soup. If you're making in advance, cool the beans and refrigerate, reserving both the now very soft garlic cloves and a small amount of the cooking liquid.  The cooked beans are now triple in volume from their dried state, about 6 cups.